Archive for September, 2012

Bligh’s Oaks, Pitt Town

Posted by Nina in Best of The Commons
Bligh's Oaks, Pitt Town

Kerry and Co, Sydney, Australia.
Bligh’s Oaks, Pitt Town,
c. 1884-1917.
Powerhouse Museum Collection: 85/1284-2287

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Eponyms: Names, Faces, Menus

Posted by Penny in Across The Commons

Ever wonder why food is named the way it is? The Commons has some answers…

Queen Margherita turned up in this week’s Library of Congress uploads to Flickr Commons. She’s the eponym of the “margherita pizza,” a standard combination of toppings (mozzarella, tomato, basil). Margherita pizza was served to the Queen Consort in 1889, in Naples, as an edible representation of the Italian flag (red/white/green). The name stuck. Margherita of Savoy
Library of Congress
Another famous Italian woman of the late 19th/early 20th century, coloratura soprano Luisa Tetrazzini, inspired a San Francisco chef to create “tetrazzini,” a dish with pasta, almonds, mushrooms, and parmesan sauce. Mme. Tetrazzini
Library of Congress
Staying in the music world, we find Dame Nellie Melba, Australian opera singer, who was honored with several namesake dishes, including Peach Melba (ice cream with peaches and raspberry sauce), and melba toast (a dry flat cracker). Dame Nellie Melba
State Library of New South Wales
Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova had a meringue dessert named for her, because it was said to be as “light as Pavlova.” Anna Pavlova
State Library of New South Wales

Want more? Wikipedia has a List of Foods Names after People, and a List of Foods and Drinks Named for Places, for your all edible history needs.

5:00 A.M. Sunday May 8th, 1910. Starting out with papers from McIntyres Branch. Chestnut & 16th Sts.,. Location: St. Louis, Missouri. (LOC)

Posted by Nina in Best of The Commons
5:00 A.M. Sunday May 8th, 1910. Starting out with papers from McIntyres Branch. Chestnut & 16th Sts.,. Location: St. Louis, Missouri. (LOC)

Hine, Lewis Wickes,, 1874-1940,, photographer.
5:00 A.M. Sunday May 8th, 1910. Starting out with papers from McIntyres Branch. Chestnut & 16th Sts.,. Location: St. Louis, Missouri. (LOC),
1910 May 8.
Library of Congress: LOT 7480, v. 2, no. 1370

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Nan de Gallant, 4 Clark St., Eastport, Maine, 9 year old cartoner, Seacoast Canning Co., Factory #2 … (LOC)

Posted by Nina in Best of The Commons
Nan de Gallant, 4 Clark St., Eastport, Maine, 9 year old cartoner, Seacoast Canning Co., Factory #2 ... (LOC)

Hine, Lewis Wickes,, 1874-1940,, photographer.
Nan de Gallant, 4 Clark St., Eastport, Maine, 9 year old cartoner, Seacoast Canning Co., Factory #2 … (LOC),
1911 August.
Library of Congress: LOT 7476, no. 2410

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Sandymount Castle, Dublin

Posted by Penny in Best of The Commons
Sandymount Castle, Dublin

Fergus O’Connor
Sandymount Castle, Dublin, 1900-1920
National Library of Ireland: OCO 381

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Here’s a fine Flickr Commons tale. The National Library of Ireland has developed an extraordinarily committed (and funny!) group of commenters who are tenacious when there’s a mystery to solve. Headlines, automobile models, even clock faces are studied and analyzed to identify the unidentified. Last November, a group of early 20c. images from the Fergus O’Connor Collection were uploaded to Flickr Commons, and one was only called “Large house, with a clock tower and crenellated rooftop, in an unknown location.” For ten months, the location remained unknown, but comments and guesses kept arriving–two pages worth! Was it in Cork? A film set, perhaps, or a convent?

This week, Flickr user zetetic2006 finally had the answer: Sandymount Castle, near Dublin. Here’s the comment left:

I recognised it immediately! It’s Sandymount Castle on Sandymount Green in Dublin, the crenellated clock-tower is a giveaway. The rear of the castle backs onto the southern side of the Green where you can still see the clock tower, check out Google Maps. The view in this photo is no more, Castle Park was built in these grounds, sometime in the 50’s or 60’s I think.

Fellow Flickr user Niall McAuley confirmed this identification promptly, from Google Streetview, maps, and Bing’s bird’s-eye view, and the National Library of Ireland confessed speechlessness at the mystery’s solution. “I live under a mile from this building,” noted the amazed librarian, “and pass by Sandymount Green at least once a week!”